It Only Takes One ‘YES’

Exactly 2 years ago, I was graduating from undergrad and worrying about PA school. When I woke up that morning, I felt like sh!t because the last school who had me on a waiting list was hosting the incoming class orientation the same day I was getting my B.A. On my way to the ceremony, I got a call from the Administrator asking if I still wanted to be on the wait list. I was shocked cause I thought the class was completed. Ofcourse I accepted and she promised to get back to me later that day. I checked and rechecked my phone all day. This was worse than waiting for a reply after sending a guy a lengthy or risky message. By the end of the day no phone call came. That night, after beating myself up mentally, I opened up CASPA and started entering my data for another application cycle.

2 days later – spongebob voice

On June 1, I got another phone call. The person asked if I still wanted to join the class. I thought someone was playing a cruel joke on me. I was a few seconds from cussing someone out! After he explained that he was part of admissions committee, he asked the question again. My initial thought was to say “No”. I had chucked up the cycle as a lesson and that I’ll do better the next time around. I asked my cousin who was laying next to me, what she thought and she looked at me as if I was crazy!!

Maybe I was…

I mean who turns down what they had been praying for?? I almost did because I was scared. I was scared that just maybe, I wasn’t ready, or that if they took that long to get to me, it wasn’t meant for me yet. I know you’re probably like “girl are you mad?”. Obviously you know I ended up accepting because I’ve shared the journey over the last two years with everyone who will listen but I wanted to share that the road to your dream may not happen as you imagined it. I surely never imagined that I’d be starting PA school 2 days after the whole class started but it happened. Your journey will be different from mine, at your own allotted time stamp according to God. And when that time comes, don’t let fear or doubt win.

3 TIPS YOU’LL NEED FOR CASPA 2019

By now as a Pre-PA, you’ve researched all sort of questions and tips to help with the application process of getting into Physician Assistant school. While I hope every advice you’ve come along helps to make your journey a little easier, my most important advice is to trust yourself & your instinct. I read through a lot of posts myself when I was applying and 3 things I gathered, which helped to go the extra mile were my : recommendation letter, personal statement and the selection of school I applied to.

Recommendation letter:
While you will need an average of three letters, & atleast one of them from your supervising PA or MD, make sure they put great effort into writing a letter that reflects you. You do not want a generic letter where they just spout basic adjectives. Tell them to include why they think you’ll make a great PA, why you are ready to begin the journey, what strengths & weaknesses, as well as the capacity have they seen you work in. If you have an opportunity to give them a sample recommendation letter that reflects who you are, do not hesitate to take the chance.

Personal Essay:
This is one place you get to shine aside from your grades. You should write about something that reflects you and not what you think the reader may like/want. Ask other PAs, PA-C or admission faculties at your school to review your work. Write multiple drafts & continue to stay true to your story. Once your gpa gets you through the initial screening process, personal statements can make or break you.

School of choice:
Pick schools that support your best interests. Do you have safe & reach schools within your list? Will you actually want to attend the school? What does their support system in the school look like? What is their passing rate? Research schools close to you and those very far. Do not be afraid to look into schools across the country and if they fit you, apply. Some people only apply to one school while others apply to 20 schools, but I always advice a wide range within your budget ofcourse. Don’t apply to schools that you won’t meet their minimum requirements by the time you submit your application or finish your degree. No one has got money to waste.

If you notice a theme in these tips, it was on purpose. Your application should be a true REFLECTION of who YOU are. Not of an idea of what you think the admins are looking for. They go through thousands of apps yearly and can smell B.S a mile away. You got thisโšกโšก

Good luck with your application and may the odds ever be in your favor.

OB-GYN, Ophthalmology & Internal Medicine

Since my General Surgery rotation, I have completed OB-GYN, Ophthalmology and Internal Medicine as well. Each one was unique in its own right.

OBGYN : I enjoyed this rotation much more than I originally thought I would. It allowed me to get ALOT of hands on experience. I completed history and physical, breast exam, vaginal exam, pap smears, ultrasound, D&C, assisted during labor, on hysterectomies and much more. Although it was beautiful to assist on births, I realized that I loved the GYN aspect than the obstetrics. I can see myself as a GYN PA which is something I never thought I’d say.

Ophthalmology: This was an elective that I chose after I couldn’t get my first few choices and it rocked! I didn’t realize the amount of people who came into the clinic for acute and chronic eye problems. I got to work with some of the best residents and attending’s who taught my classmate and I the ropes. I worked on minor procedures such as removing a pterygium, cyst, complete full work on patients, learn to use the tonometry and much more. Ophthalmology was different from other specialty because you’re not doing a physical on the whole body, so I had to learn the anatomy of the eyes all over again, which parts to focus on depending on the complain of the patient and what sort of treatment to prescribe. It was a great experience that I will always carry with me.

Internal Medicine: My first rotation of the year and I’m glad it is over. I honestly felt like this rotation went on forever because it wasn’t my favorite one. I had a great team but IM was too slow for me. There wasn’t any “hands on” work which made it hard for me to like it. I enjoy doing something with my hands, which is why I like surgery. There are only so much venipuncture you can do until you’re over it. I did learned that you must advocate effectively for your patient while on this rotation. I had to speak up regarding the treatment plans for some of my patients and I had an attending who listened to us. Always keep your patient needs a top priority.

Take away points :

  1. Ask questions. If youโ€™re not sure of a lab value, vitals, status or information, donโ€™t make it up to look good for that moment. Just say, โ€œIdk, but Iโ€™ll check & get back to youโ€. It shows that youโ€™re taking responsibility and not placing a patientโ€™s health in jeopardy.
  2. Introduce yourself. Never walk into the delivery room without prior introduction of yourself. I have seen some students walk into the room and proceed to assist with deliveries without any introduction. It is simply rude and unprofessional.
  3. It is more than okay to quote Uptodate. Everyone uses Uptodate because that is one of the fastest and easiest ways to cross reference your treatment plan. Don’t be embarrassed.
  4. Use your down time wisely. IM had a lot of downtime and I used those moments to study. I brought my PPP and laptop to clinical so I never have an excuse for not working. I would ask the team if they needed help and when they don’t, I’ll study
  5. Be open. I didn’t think I’d enjoy my elective but I did. Just remember that each experience has some value and it is teaching you to know what type of PA you’d like to be.
  6. Plan ahead. Look up the direction to your rotation site and plan for any mishap. Pack your lunch ahead, have a snack in you pocket, dress warm for the winter hours because you don’t want to be tardy or get sick

How did I PASS my EORs??

  1. I prayed ALOT to God.
  2. I printed out the topic list from PAEA (our school uses their EOR exams).
  3. Read Pance Prep Pearlโ€™s according to the topics needed. PPP went everywhere with me, literally.
  4. Blueprint OBGYN and First Aid OBGYN textbooks
  5. StepUp to Medicine for IM
  6. OnlineMedEd videos for an โ€œin lectureโ€ recap & took notes.
  7. Rosh Review and Smarty Pance for questions. I also used Rosh boost EOR exam for OBGYN & IM.

Any questions, comment, e-mail and check out my Instagram for frequent updates.

My First Rotation : General Surgery

When I found out I had Surgery as my first rotation, I was nervous. I heard horror stories about surgery, how tough and terrible some of the team members were. But, I was also excited because I have an interest in it. In my mind, it was either going to solidify if I can be a surgical PA or scrap that idea entirely.

Thankfully, I loved my time in General Surgery. I loved the types of surgeries we did, the patient care and how the team worked together. I got to work autonomously for majority of the time by taking H&P, writing my notes, presenting to the Residents or the Attending. I also was 2nd assist in all the surgeries I scrubbed in on ( the lovely job of retracting, suctioning, guiding the scope at times, and closing) because the Interns were the 1st.

I got feedback from various people such as how well I did with my h&p, patient/provider interaction, overall professionalism as well as things to work on (i.e- how to work on my notes, suturing, knot tying, and other placed I can improve upon).

Take away points :

  1. If you dont know it, dont say that you do. If you’re not sure of a lab value, vitals, status or information, don’t make it up to look good for that moment. Just say, “idk, but I’ll check & get back to you”. It shows that you’re taking responsibility and not placing a patient’s health in jeopardy.
  2. Read about the usual Gen Surgeries.ย I only got pimped ( when MDs ask you questions about medication, anatomy, physiology, etc on the SPOT, mostly likely in the OR while retracting lol) a handful of times and only once was it embarrassing. I advise reading your basic blood vessels of the GI tract, anatomy of the GI, and any interesting case coming, read about it!
  3. Be attuned to your surroundings. Pay attention to the discussions happening around you because it looks bad if someone ask you for an update on a patient on your team and you don’t know what is going on. The team is constantly busy, moving at a fast speed that it can be overwhelming the first few days, but if you just ask what can be done to ease their workload, it will help you find your footing much better and faster.
  4. Follow up on your patients. You’re usually assigned one or two patients to follow. Round on them before your AM round, complete pertinent physical exam, ask the patient of they understand the plans and monitor them throughout the day. As students, we get more face time with the patients than the team does.
  5. Work with everyone on the floor. Get the nurses to teach you how to draw blood if you dont know how or not comfortable. Help out the nurses whenever you can. Anyone need a specimens sent to the lab? Volunteer. They’re are doing wound care rounds? Go ahead and offer to assist. You’ll learn from not only the immediate providers but from the axillary team as well.
  6. Feedbacks are important. To have someone who tells you how you’re doing & where you can improve will help you as you round out your time with the team. So, ask the Residents or anyone you’re working closely with about how you’re doing if no one has by your 4th week.
  7. Study while on rotation.ย You’ll have some down time where you can whip out your tablet, notes, or phone and get some questions or videos in before your next case. You can also work on your writeups so it doesn’t pile up for later. Use your time efficiently.
  8. Perfect your craft. Practice how to tie your knots and sutures. Perfect your history taking and your physicals. Volunteer a lot. You learn by doing.
  9. Take care of yourself. You’re going to be up before dawn (I was usually up by 4:30am because my site was very close. Imagine if it was further??). Sleep early, keep snacks on you for busy days. Plan accordingly. Set aside time to study, even if it’s just an hour a day and time to have fun.ย Go out with friends and decompress with loved ones, because it can get overwhelming very fast!

How did I PASS my EOR??

  1. I prayed ALOT to God.
  2. I printed out the topic list from PAEA (our school uses their EOR exams).
  3. Read Pance Prep Pearl’s according to the topics needed. PPP went everywhere with me, literally.
  4. OnlineMedEd videos for an “in lecture” recap & took notes.
  5. Rosh Review and Smarty Pance for questions.

I can honestly say I had a great time in Surgery, which was not what I expected. I complained about my early mornings, but I learned alot in such a short time, often looked forward to the procedures. I am looking forward to the remaining 9 rotations, so wish me luck and watch this space!!

Any questions, comment, e-mail and check out my Instagram for frequent updates.

My Failures…

#failforwardcampaign, a campaign started on Instagram by Aleah of Medicine in Michigan

It is so easy to see an IG feed or a blog and think of how perfect life is because it shows mostly one side of that person but it’s mostly just an illusion…
IMG_20180210_125813_508

See the picture above, I look very happy, (I truly was cause my friend gave me a Kit Kat bar, I’m a simple gal ๐Ÿ˜„๐Ÿ˜„) but what it doesn’t tell you is the amount of anxiety I was feeling after a long grueling morning that day ๐Ÿ˜ฉ (PHARMACOLOGY exam will do that to you). So I say all that to tell you not to feel like you’re alone when you fail at something, especially if you’re on your journey toward PA school.
1. I failed my precalc final in undergrad & received a C in my 1st semester of college.

2. I withdrew from biochem right before the first exam because I wasn’t ready and was going through some life changes at that time.

3. I applied to 9 PA schools, waitlisted for interview at 2, interviewed at 3 schools, waitlisted for admission at 2 and waitlisted then accepted at my current school.

4. Applied to alot of scholarships with really well written essays & resume and got none.

5. Failed my first exam in PA School (Anatomy)

I’m sharing this for that one person who is thinking, “they may not be enough”, remember, your failures doesn’t define you, it’s what you do after each one that does. You must always get back up after falling because it makes you appreciate.

How do I get Direct Patient Care for PA School Application?

Before applying to PA school, you must be doing your research and noticed alot of school require “direct patient care” hours.

Direct Patient Care is when you’re actually “doing” something on the patient. It could be taking vitals, reminding patient to take medication, assisting in the OR,ย  assisting with ADL’s and many more.

Several jobs can give you this opportunity and it is imperative to begin acquiring the hours before applying to school, so you’ll have them ready.

Suggested job:

  • Nurse Aide
  • Licensed Practical Nurse
  • Emergency Medical Technicians
  • Medical Assistants
  • ER/OR Tech
  • Paramedics
  • Scribe

You can watch my full video here:ย ย Clinical Experence on YouTube

 

FIRST DAY OF 3RD SEMESTER IN PA SCHOOL

Happy New Year!

I started Physician Assistant (PA) school last June, and I have gone through so much changes, I’m not sure I can keep count. But I do know that I am preparing myself to be a great professional by the time I graduate. I’m sharing my journey on YouTube and I hope I’m able to help anyone who is looking into the profession as well.

PA School |Starting 3rd Semester of Didactic Year Overwhelmed

I recorded how my first day back to school felt like and the classes I would be taking. Each class has various expectations, but by the spring semester is over in May, I will be one step toward my short term goal : white coat ceremony in August.