Book Review: He Forgot To Say Goodbye

He Forgot To Say Goodbye by Benjamin Sรกenz
Publisher: Simon Shuster
Published: June 17 2008
Rated: โคโคโคโค/5
Buy or Burrow: Buy

People don’t always have to do the right thing for the right reasonsโ€”so long as they do the right thing.

Synopsis: Two teens with different social standings have one thing in common : a father they know very little about. Circumstance brings them together and both boys try to understand why their fathers left without saying goodbyeย 

I believe that we’re searching to understand ourselves in this life and the world around us. To have parents who are present and guiding while young makes that search a little bit easier… but what if you don’t get that? What if you’re missing a mom or dad, because he or she decided not to say goodbye when they left?

He forgot to say goodbye followed Ram and Jake as they try to understand why their fathers left.

Ram’s dad left him and his younger brother and his mom refused to talk about him. Over the years, he made a version of his father in his head, while trying to quietly make something of himself. His fragile heart was obvious from the first page and how he dealt with another person leaving him nearly breaks him. Jake also grew up without his father, a mom that makes you want to yell every time she spoke and a step father that you can’t help but dislike immediately.

The physical difference between the two boys is broad but dealing with an absent father you constantly long for can diminish your differences, especially when you realize that you only wanted them to love and think you’re enough to be remembered.

The novel felt like an unrestrained journal you’re permitted to read and learn from. The young, exposed and flexible tone from both boys made for an enjoyable read even during the tough pages. You don’t have to have an absent parent or be a teen to trust the voice of the characters. It makes you want to promise to be a better version of yourself, hug the ones that stay and love a little harder.

Book Review: Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe
By: Benjamin A Sรกenz
Publisher: Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers
Pub date: 02/21/2012
Rate โคโคโคโค/5
Buy or borrow: buy

Aristotle is an angry teen with a brother in prison. Dante is a know-it-all who has an unusual way of looking at the world. When the two meet at the swimming pool, they seem to have nothing in common. But as the loners start spending time together, they discover that they share a special friendshipโ€”the kind that changes lives and lasts a lifetime. And it is through this friendship that Ari and Dante will learn the most important truths about themselves and the kind of people they want to be – Simon and Schuster

Aristole and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe (ADDSotU) covered different facets of life, from a friendship between two young boys who on the outside seemed like an unlikely duo, to a family dealing with shame and regret in an unhealthy manner. Aristotle and Dante not only tried to discover the secrets of the universe but helped their families find a few of their own.

While reading ADDSotU, I found that the author treated each relationship with care. It was refreshing to read the fragile relationship between Aristotle and his father, the push and pull between Aristotle and his mother as well as how easy Dante welcomed Aristole into his life and family. I had no choice but to fall in love with both of the boys as they helped each other. I enjoyed this book so much because of the support each teen got from their family in every aspect of their life, even though each one showed it differently. ADDSotU reminds you that family is very important during the years when teens are still figuring out where they belong in this big world.

I also found that the writing was witty, simple and unrushed. Sรกenz didn’t fill the pages with unnecessary details that wasn’t moving the plot along.

Aristole and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe is a self discovery book that would touch not only teens hoping to learn a thing or two about the secrets of the universe but adults could find some secrets worth discovering as well.

I’ll be posting my summer reading list. Let me know if you’ll be reading any books this summer.

B.


CR: Through To You

I’m starting my October Tbr list and the first book will be Through To You by Lauren Barnholdt.

Here is an synopsis from Simon and Schuster website.

“It starts with a scribbled note in class: I like your sparkle. Harper had casually threaded a piece of blue and silver tinsel through her ponytail in honor of school spirit day. And that carefree, corny gesture is what grabs Penn Mattinglyโ€™s eye. Pennโ€”resident heartbreaker of the senior class. Reliably unreliable. Trouble with a capital โ€œT.โ€ And okay,smolderingly sexy.

Harperโ€™s surprised by Pennโ€™s attentionโ€”and so is Penn. The last thing he needs is a girlfriend. Or even a friend-with-benefits. The note is not supposed to lead to anything.

Oh, but it does. They hang out. They have fun. They talk. They make out. And after a while, it seems like they just click. But Penn and Harper have very different ideas about what relationships look like, in no small part because of their very different family backgrounds. Of course they could talk about these differencesโ€”if Penn knew how to talk about his feelings.

Harper and Penn understand their attraction is illogical, yet something keeps pulling them together. Itโ€™s like a crazy roller coasterโ€”exhilarating,terrifying, and amazing all at once. And neither knows how to stop the rideโ€ฆ”

Can’t wait to dig in!

I’m going on a Mini Vacay tomorrow and super excited! I’ll share the books I’ll be bringing along tomorrow!

Happy Saturday guys!

โค

CR: Things Fall Apart

School is back in session guys and I’m reading Things Fall Apart for my World Lit class. I came across this book many years ago (either 9th or 10th grade) and was amazed by it.

I will tell you the truth, there was many lessons I did not grasp at the time but its different now. I’m reading it as an adult, with a broader vision and looking for key information that the author places throughout this work of art.

I’m looking forward to discussion in class and maybe create one here later.

What do you think? Have you read?