OB-GYN, Ophthalmology & Internal Medicine

Since my General Surgery rotation, I have completed OB-GYN, Ophthalmology and Internal Medicine as well. Each one was unique in its own right.

OBGYN : I enjoyed this rotation much more than I originally thought I would. It allowed me to get ALOT of hands on experience. I completed history and physical, breast exam, vaginal exam, pap smears, ultrasound, D&C, assisted during labor, on hysterectomies and much more. Although it was beautiful to assist on births, I realized that I loved the GYN aspect than the obstetrics. I can see myself as a GYN PA which is something I never thought I’d say.

Ophthalmology: This was an elective that I chose after I couldn’t get my first few choices and it rocked! I didn’t realize the amount of people who came into the clinic for acute and chronic eye problems. I got to work with some of the best residents and attending’s who taught my classmate and I the ropes. I worked on minor procedures such as removing a pterygium, cyst, complete full work on patients, learn to use the tonometry and much more. Ophthalmology was different from other specialty because you’re not doing a physical on the whole body, so I had to learn the anatomy of the eyes all over again, which parts to focus on depending on the complain of the patient and what sort of treatment to prescribe. It was a great experience that I will always carry with me.

Internal Medicine: My first rotation of the year and I’m glad it is over. I honestly felt like this rotation went on forever because it wasn’t my favorite one. I had a great team but IM was too slow for me. There wasn’t any “hands on” work which made it hard for me to like it. I enjoy doing something with my hands, which is why I like surgery. There are only so much venipuncture you can do until you’re over it. I did learned that you must advocate effectively for your patient while on this rotation. I had to speak up regarding the treatment plans for some of my patients and I had an attending who listened to us. Always keep your patient needs a top priority.

Take away points :

  1. Ask questions. If youโ€™re not sure of a lab value, vitals, status or information, donโ€™t make it up to look good for that moment. Just say, โ€œIdk, but Iโ€™ll check & get back to youโ€. It shows that youโ€™re taking responsibility and not placing a patientโ€™s health in jeopardy.
  2. Introduce yourself. Never walk into the delivery room without prior introduction of yourself. I have seen some students walk into the room and proceed to assist with deliveries without any introduction. It is simply rude and unprofessional.
  3. It is more than okay to quote Uptodate. Everyone uses Uptodate because that is one of the fastest and easiest ways to cross reference your treatment plan. Don’t be embarrassed.
  4. Use your down time wisely. IM had a lot of downtime and I used those moments to study. I brought my PPP and laptop to clinical so I never have an excuse for not working. I would ask the team if they needed help and when they don’t, I’ll study
  5. Be open. I didn’t think I’d enjoy my elective but I did. Just remember that each experience has some value and it is teaching you to know what type of PA you’d like to be.
  6. Plan ahead. Look up the direction to your rotation site and plan for any mishap. Pack your lunch ahead, have a snack in you pocket, dress warm for the winter hours because you don’t want to be tardy or get sick

How did I PASS my EORs??

  1. I prayed ALOT to God.
  2. I printed out the topic list from PAEA (our school uses their EOR exams).
  3. Read Pance Prep Pearlโ€™s according to the topics needed. PPP went everywhere with me, literally.
  4. Blueprint OBGYN and First Aid OBGYN textbooks
  5. StepUp to Medicine for IM
  6. OnlineMedEd videos for an โ€œin lectureโ€ recap & took notes.
  7. Rosh Review and Smarty Pance for questions. I also used Rosh boost EOR exam for OBGYN & IM.

Any questions, comment, e-mail and check out my Instagram for frequent updates.

My First Rotation : General Surgery

When I found out I had Surgery as my first rotation, I was nervous. I heard horror stories about surgery, how tough and terrible some of the team members were. But, I was also excited because I have an interest in it. In my mind, it was either going to solidify if I can be a surgical PA or scrap that idea entirely.

Thankfully, I loved my time in General Surgery. I loved the types of surgeries we did, the patient care and how the team worked together. I got to work autonomously for majority of the time by taking H&P, writing my notes, presenting to the Residents or the Attending. I also was 2nd assist in all the surgeries I scrubbed in on ( the lovely job of retracting, suctioning, guiding the scope at times, and closing) because the Interns were the 1st.

I got feedback from various people such as how well I did with my h&p, patient/provider interaction, overall professionalism as well as things to work on (i.e- how to work on my notes, suturing, knot tying, and other placed I can improve upon).

Take away points :

  1. If you dont know it, dont say that you do. If you’re not sure of a lab value, vitals, status or information, don’t make it up to look good for that moment. Just say, “idk, but I’ll check & get back to you”. It shows that you’re taking responsibility and not placing a patient’s health in jeopardy.
  2. Read about the usual Gen Surgeries.ย I only got pimped ( when MDs ask you questions about medication, anatomy, physiology, etc on the SPOT, mostly likely in the OR while retracting lol) a handful of times and only once was it embarrassing. I advise reading your basic blood vessels of the GI tract, anatomy of the GI, and any interesting case coming, read about it!
  3. Be attuned to your surroundings. Pay attention to the discussions happening around you because it looks bad if someone ask you for an update on a patient on your team and you don’t know what is going on. The team is constantly busy, moving at a fast speed that it can be overwhelming the first few days, but if you just ask what can be done to ease their workload, it will help you find your footing much better and faster.
  4. Follow up on your patients. You’re usually assigned one or two patients to follow. Round on them before your AM round, complete pertinent physical exam, ask the patient of they understand the plans and monitor them throughout the day. As students, we get more face time with the patients than the team does.
  5. Work with everyone on the floor. Get the nurses to teach you how to draw blood if you dont know how or not comfortable. Help out the nurses whenever you can. Anyone need a specimens sent to the lab? Volunteer. They’re are doing wound care rounds? Go ahead and offer to assist. You’ll learn from not only the immediate providers but from the axillary team as well.
  6. Feedbacks are important. To have someone who tells you how you’re doing & where you can improve will help you as you round out your time with the team. So, ask the Residents or anyone you’re working closely with about how you’re doing if no one has by your 4th week.
  7. Study while on rotation.ย You’ll have some down time where you can whip out your tablet, notes, or phone and get some questions or videos in before your next case. You can also work on your writeups so it doesn’t pile up for later. Use your time efficiently.
  8. Perfect your craft. Practice how to tie your knots and sutures. Perfect your history taking and your physicals. Volunteer a lot. You learn by doing.
  9. Take care of yourself. You’re going to be up before dawn (I was usually up by 4:30am because my site was very close. Imagine if it was further??). Sleep early, keep snacks on you for busy days. Plan accordingly. Set aside time to study, even if it’s just an hour a day and time to have fun.ย Go out with friends and decompress with loved ones, because it can get overwhelming very fast!

How did I PASS my EOR??

  1. I prayed ALOT to God.
  2. I printed out the topic list from PAEA (our school uses their EOR exams).
  3. Read Pance Prep Pearl’s according to the topics needed. PPP went everywhere with me, literally.
  4. OnlineMedEd videos for an “in lecture” recap & took notes.
  5. Rosh Review and Smarty Pance for questions.

I can honestly say I had a great time in Surgery, which was not what I expected. I complained about my early mornings, but I learned alot in such a short time, often looked forward to the procedures. I am looking forward to the remaining 9 rotations, so wish me luck and watch this space!!

Any questions, comment, e-mail and check out my Instagram for frequent updates.